PanSolidification


PanSolidification: Solidification simulation view documentations

The solidification behavior of an alloy is determined by its solidification path, which describes the phase formation sequence during solidification. Solidification path of an alloy was usually simulated by two approximate models, equilibrium (lever-rule) and non-equilibrium (Scheil-Gulliver) models. In the lever-rule, complete mixing is assumed in both liquid and solid, which represents an equilibrium case. In the Scheil-Gulliver model, it assumes complete mixing in the liquid, but no diffusion in the solid. While these two models are simple and straightforward, the practical solidification process is much more complicated. To predict the final as-cast microstructure, elemental diffusion in the solid often needs to be considered. For databases used by PanSolidification, please refer to Databases for more information.

The PanSolidification module is designed for the simulation of solidification behavior of multicomponent alloys under a variety of conditions with different cooling rates. It is an extension of the Scheil model taking into consideration of back diffusion in the solid, secondary dendrite arm coarsening, and the formation of eutectic structure. It is seamlessly integrated with the user-friendly Pandat Graphical User Interface (PanGUI) as well as thermodynamic calculation engine, PanEngine. The implementation of PanEngine guarantees reliable input data, such as chemical potential, phase equilibrium and mobility. Below figure shows an overall architecture of the PanSolidification module. This module can predict the secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), microsegregation, types and amounts of non-equilibrium phases in the solidification microstructure of multi-component alloys by incorporating back diffusion in the solidified primary phase, as well as the undercooling and dendrite arm coarsening during solidification.



Featured Plots of PanSolidification Module

This figure shows a comparison between the simulated and measured Al composition profiles as a function of the fraction of primary α (Mg) phase for Mg-4Al (wt%) alloy at two cooling rates: 0.2K/s and 0.8K/s. Simulation results by Scheil model is also plotted for the purpose of comparison.

This figure shows a comparison between the simulated and measured AL composition profiles as a function of the fraction of primary α (Mg) phase for three magnesium rich alloys: Mg-3Al, Mg-6Al, and Mg-9Al (wt%) at the cooling rate of 0.375K/s.

This figure shows a comparison between the simulated and measured secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS) for a few Mg-Al binary alloys.